“Sprinting” Articles and Posts

Scrum projects make progress in short, timeboxed periods that other agile process call iterations. Knowing how to successful execute a sprint or iteration is vital to the success of any Scrum or agile development project.

What Is Quality?

Agile teams build high-quality products. Agile team members write high-quality code. Agile teams produce functionality quickly by not sacrificing quality.

Each of these is something I’ve said before. And if you haven’t said these exact things, you’ve likely...

Now vs. Not-Now Prioritization Along with Medium-Term Goals

The following was originally published in Mike Cohn's monthly newsletter. If you like what you're reading, sign up to have this content delivered to your inbox weeks before it's posted on the blog, here.

In last month’s newsletter I wrote about how we make personal financial decisions in a now vs. not-now manner. We don’t map out must-haves,...

Schedule vs. Cost: The Tradeoff in Agile

To a large extent, agile is about making tradeoffs. Product owners learn they can trade scope for schedule: get more later or less sooner. Agile projects need to strike a balance between no upfront thinking and too much upfront thinking, a subject I’ve written about before.

I want to write now about a tradeoff that isn’t talked about a lot in agile circles. And this is the…

Know Exactly What Velocity Means to Your Scrum Team

The following was originally published in Mike Cohn's monthly newsletter. If you like what you're reading, sign up to have this content delivered to your inbox weeks before it's posted on the blog, here.

To see how this applies to an agile project, consider the issue of whether a team should earn velocity credit for fixing bugs during a sprint. A team that uses velocity to measure how much functionality is delivered in a sprint will not claim credit for bug fixes. No new functionality...

Six Times Two Plus One Equals a Good Project Cadence

The following was originally published in Mike Cohn's monthly newsletter. If you like what you're reading, sign up to have this content delivered to your inbox weeks before it's posted on the blog, here.

In last month's newsletter I wrote about the idea that everything happens within a sprint. There is no "outside a sprint" during which team members might do things like design, bug fixing, or anything else. In this newsletter I want to share one possible exception to